PSMA

PET-CT

A new type of scan that could help catch and treat prostate cancer earlier – possibly resulting in a cure in some cases – is now available at Paul Strickland Scanner Centre.

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Pierre du Bois
13 March, 2018

A new type of scan that could help catch and treat prostate cancer earlier – possibly resulting in a cure in some cases – is now available at Paul Strickland Scanner Centre.

The centre is now amongst the very limited number of facilities in the UK to offer Gallium-labelled Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) PET-CT scanning.

The new scan could be particularly useful for men who have been treated for prostate cancer and are in remission (but under surveillance with regular blood tests) to make sure that they are clear of the disease. Some doctors believe that especially the relatively small number of patients who are at higher risk of developing metastatic disease (where the cancer spreads to outside the prostate gland) could really benefit, and it could mean catching and treating their cancer earlier – possibly resulting in a cure.

Dr Wai-Lup Wong, Lead Consultant for PET-CT at Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, said: “The most sensitive test for prostate cancer is still a blood test to establish prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels. When PSA levels are creeping up over time, or where they suddenly become very high, there will be a suspicion that cancer has returned and patients are usually sent for a scan. There is an increasing weight of evidence showing that a PSMA PET-CT scan is more sensitive than a traditionally used choline PET-CT scan for detecting disease.”

Although it is readily used in Europe, PSMA PET-CT scanning is not currently available on the NHS, but your NHS doctor may be able to refer you if you’re able to secure funding from elsewhere.

If you're interested in a PSMA PET-CT scan, peak to your doctor or medical team or make an enquiry.

Picture: High quality images from a PSMA PET-CT scan at Paul Strickland Scanner Centre, clearly showing suspected cancer (red arrow), that was missed using a conventional scan.

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