Paul Strickland Scanner Centre adds “enormous value” to Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, according to the incoming President of the Royal College of Radiologists.

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Pierre du Bois
22 August, 2019

Paul Strickland Scanner Centre adds “enormous value” to Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, according to the incoming President of the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR), Dr Jeanette Dickson.

Dr Dickson, a consultant oncologist at Mount Vernon Cancer Centre who has been vice president of the RCR for a number of years, is taking over as president of the college in September. She will remain a consultant at Mount Vernon during her tenure and is looking forward to the challenges brought by her new role.

She said: “I really like Paul Strickland Scanner Centre and it’s a very interesting place. The radiologists at the centre focus on extremely complex scans, and the centre benefits from very advanced, up to date scanners and software. This means the centre is at the cutting edge of what can be produced.

“Paul Strickland Scanner Centre adds enormous value to Mount Vernon because the team is so specialised in cancer imaging. Whether CT, PET-CT or MRI, there is always somebody who has the expertise and willingness to discuss cases and scans with oncologists. That’s really good for the cancer centre and ultimately benefits patients’ treatment.

“In particular when it comes to radiotherapy planning, there is always someone to help. The team is totally invested in cancer imaging and delivers a very high quality service, which adds a huge amount of value to patient care.

“Patients at the cancer centre really benefit from having such fantastic scanning capacity on site.”

Dr Dickson sees the demand for cancer scans increasingly dramatically in coming years – in particular for the more complex scans, which Paul Strickland Scanner Centre specialises in. These require advanced scanners and software, which are not always available elsewhere.

She believes the value of radiologists will become even more obvious in the coming years as artificial intelligence takes off. It will mean the need for highly trained staff who can interpret and give context to reports produced by computers in conversations with oncologists as well as patients will become more apparent.

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